Vulture Safe Zone signage at Chisamba Important Bird & Biodiversity Area © BirdWatch Zambia
21 Apr 2021

Zambia's Vulture Safe Zones provide hope for African vultures

Poisoning – both accidental and deliberate – has driven Africa's vultures to the brink of extinction. But hope is at hand: a new series of poison-free safe spaces are protecting vultures, raising awareness and advancing research in Zambia.
Socially distanced birding was a big hit last year © David Tipling
21 Apr 2021

Global Big Day: fundraise for BirdLife and protect migratory birds

Wherever you are in the world on Saturday 8th May, we hope you will join us to mark World Migratory Bird Day, and celebrate the ever-inspiring miracle of migration by doing something enjoyable and valuable.
Near-invisible "mist nets" are often used to trap birds like this Common Kingfisher on migration © BCST
19 Apr 2021

New study: at least 180 migratory land bird species trapped across Asia

The latest research sheds new light on the plight of land birds that migrate across Asia, revealing that at least 180 species are being trapped for food, the caged bird trade and other uses – often illegally. This, together with hunting and habitat destruction, is driving widespread declines.
The White-rumped Vulture (Critically Endangered) is now on the increase in Nepal © Wade Tregaskis / Flickr
15 Apr 2021

Celebrating 10 years of saving Asia’s vultures from extinction

For the past decade, BirdLife is immensely proud to have been part of SAVE: a continent-wide collaboration to bring Asia’s vultures back from the brink. Join us in celebrating SAVE’s ground-breaking achievements over this time.
The Antipodean Albatross travels thousands of miles in search of food © Stephanie Borrelle
13 Apr 2021

New tracking data pinpoints danger zones for Antipodean Albatross

Without action, the Antipodean Albatross could go extinct within our lifetimes. To prevent this tragedy, researchers satellite-tracked 63 albatrosses to discover where they encounter the highest accidental ‘bycatch’ in tuna fishing fleets. Find out how we’re working to make these danger zones safe.
Knobbed Hornbill, BirdLife International

Become part of a worldwide community of nature lovers, and help to make a lasting impact

Rice field in Sumatra, Indonesia © Nico Boersen / Pixabay
08 Apr 2021

Sustainable farming & forestry could reduce extinction risks by 40%

Making timber and crop production sustainable would address some of the biggest drivers of wildlife decline. This finding comes from a new tool, STAR, that allows companies, governments and civil society to accurately measure their progress in stemming global species loss.
08 Apr 2021

Diclofenac claims first official victim in Europe: the Cinereous Vulture

A Cinerous Vulture born in 2020 in the Boumort National Hunting Reserve has now been confirmed as the first victim of a vulture species to die from poisoning by veterinary diclofenac in Europe.
Staff have been been monitoring water quality at Tonle Sap Great Lake © NatureLife Cambodia
31 Mar 2021

BirdLife welcomes new Partner: NatureLife Cambodia

Despite being one of the most biodiverse countries in Asia, Cambodia had no national NGOs working directly on conservation as recently as 15 years ago. BirdLife set out to change that, and in 2004 established a country programme. Fast forward to 2021 and NatureLife Cambodia is the newest Partner in the BirdLife flock.
Forests save countries millions by absorbing carbon from the atmosphere © Martin Mecnarowski / Shutterstock
25 Mar 2021

Protecting nature has bigger economic benefit than exploiting it

A new study analysing sites across the world has found that in most cases, economic benefits are higher when habitats are conserved or restored rather than converted to human uses such as farming. These findings add important ammunition to our fight for a greener future.
This colourful gilded tea bowl is part of a diverse catalogue of unique items © BirdLife Japan
24 Mar 2021

Save the date: BirdLife online auction starts on 29th March

Treat yourself to something special while supporting BirdLife’s important work in our 8-day exclusive auction, starting on Monday. All proceeds will go towards the BirdLife International Japan Fund for Science to support our Red List Programme.

The latest conservation news and breakthroughs, delivered to your door

Captive-reared Southern Ground Hornbills are tutored by a wild alpha male © Arno Meintjes / Flickr
23 Mar 2021

Latest research: Hornbills sent to school, turtle-dove hunting exposed

Join us for a bite-sized round-up of advances published in our journal Bird Conservation International. Highlights include the complexities of reintroducing hornbills to the wild, the truly devastating scale of European Turtle-dove hunting, and a newly-identified Spoon-billed Sandpiper moulting site.
Physical barriers like the US-Mexico wall could stop wildlife finding new habitats © Hillebrand Steve / USFWS
18 Mar 2021

National borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

As global temperature rises, species will be driven across national borders to find suitable habitat. Physical barriers like the USA-Mexico wall and fences between Russia and China aren’t the only complication. BirdLife’s Chief Scientist Dr Stuart Butchart explains how countries experiencing the greatest species loss may be in the worst position to protect nature.
Biodiversity provides a value of at least US $170-190 trillion per year © chainarong06 / Shutterstock
16 Mar 2021

Why a nature-positive economic system would benefit us all

Integrating nature into business decisions isn’t just good for the environment – it also benefits society and the economy. Here’s why the world should redirect financial flows away from nature destruction and ensure biodiversity is mainstreamed into business.
The Indian Skimmer uses its enlarged lower beak to pick up aquatic prey from the water surface © Sriram Bird Photographer / Shutterstock
11 Mar 2021

Red List update: a glimmer of hope for the Indian Skimmer

Once found across South Asia, the Indian Skimmer is now restricted to a few key sites across India and Bangladesh – hence its recent classification as Endangered. Now, new evidence that the bird travels across borders indicates we’re only skimming the surface of what needs to be done…
Double-banded Plover © Agami Photo Agency / Shutterstock
09 Mar 2021

Double trouble for the Double-banded Plover

A south Pacific shorebird with a very unusual migration pattern, the Double-banded Plover faces different threats whichever route it chooses.
Arctic tern © Markus Varesvuo

Taking the pulse of the planet

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We are a global Partnership of independent organisations working together as one for nature and people. Read more about BirdLife.

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We create action through insight. Through our expertise on birds we act for nature and people. Through sharing local challenges we find lasting global solutions. Read more about our programmes.

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